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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Treatment Pdf Free


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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Treatment Pdf Free


Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a term used to describe a group of disorders that occur when there is compression, injury, or irritation of the nerves and/or blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the lower neck and upper chest area. Thoracic outlet syndrome is named for the space (the thoracic outlet) between your lower neck and upper chest where this grouping of nerves and blood vessels is found.


Thoracic outlet syndrome affects people of all ages and gender. The condition is common among athletes who participate in sports that require repetitive motions of the arm and shoulder, such as baseball, swimming, volleyball, and other sports.


The pain of TOS is sometimes confused with the pain of angina (chest pain due to an inadequate supply of oxygen to the heart muscle), but the two conditions can be distinguished because the pain of thoracic outlet syndrome does not occur or increase when walking, while the pain of angina usually does. Additionally, the pain of TOS typically increases when raising the affected arm, which does not occur with angina.


Signs and symptoms of TOS help determine the type of disorder a patient has. Thoracic outlet syndrome disorders differ, depending on the part(s) of the body they affect. Thoracic outlet syndrome most commonly affects the nerves, but the condition can also affect the veins and arteries (least common type). In all types of TOS, the thoracic outlet space is narrowed, and there is scar formation around the structures.


The disorders caused by TOS are not well understood. Yet, it is known that when the blood vessels and/or nerves in the tight passageway of the thoracic outlet are abnormally compressed, they become irritated and can cause TOS. Thoracic outlet syndrome can be a result of an extra first rib (cervical rib) or an old fracture of the clavicle (collarbone) that reduces the space for the vessels and nerves. Bony and soft tissue abnormalities are among the many other causes of TOS. The following may increase the risk of developing thoracic outlet syndrome:


Early identification of TOS can help improve the success of treatment. Thoracic outlet syndrome treatments vary, depending on the type of TOS you have and your symptoms. The goals of treatment are to reduce symptoms and pain. Your health care provider will recommend the treatment option that is right for you.


To reduce the risk of blood clots and pulmonary embolism, treatment for venous thoracic outlet syndrome may include thrombolytic (clot-busting) or anticoagulant (blood thinning) medications and surgery. In many cases, the patient will be treated with thrombolytic medications and start anticoagulation therapy before surgery.


Department of Vascular Surgery: surgery evaluation for surgical treatment of vascular disease, including aorta, peripheral artery, and venous disease. Call Vascular Surgery Appointments, toll-free 800-223-2273, extension 44508 or request an appointment online.


Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders that occur when blood vessels or nerves in the space between your collarbone and your first rib (thoracic outlet) are compressed. This can cause shoulder and neck pain and numbness in your fingers.


Common causes of thoracic outlet syndrome include physical trauma from a car accident, repetitive injuries from job- or sports-related activities, certain anatomical defects (such as having an extra rib), and pregnancy. Sometimes doctors don't know the cause of thoracic outlet syndrome.


Treatment for thoracic outlet syndrome usually involves physical therapy and pain relief measures. Most people improve with these treatments. In some cases, however, your doctor may recommend surgery.


Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually caused by compression of the nerves or blood vessels in the thoracic outlet, just under your collarbone (clavicle). The cause of the compression varies and can include:


If you're at risk for thoracic outlet compression, avoid repetiti




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